Category Archives: Christmas

Crisis at Christmas

logo

On Monday I finished the last of the three shifts  I’d volunteered to do for Crisis at Christmas. Based at Deptford Day Centre (the closest centre to where my Mum lives) I worked the last three days before it all ended and the centre returned to being the Lewisham LeSoCo college campus.

This was my first time volunteering for Crisis. My sister Kate, author of Exploring Art in the City and a veteran Crisis volunteer (usually based at Bermondsey but taking a year off as she’s a week away from giving birth) was the one who inspired me to sign up.  She told me I’d love it and find it rewarding.She wasn’t wrong.

I wanted to volunteer last year but it didn’t happen. There were so many other life changing events going on, plus it’s not an easy task too-ing and fro-ing between Wales and London, so I have to plan my time carefully. This year it all came together, not the full seven days which I may sign up for next year, but with Christmas, kids to organise and other commitments to consider three days was the most I could manage. This year one of those kids did her own organising. Rosy my teen waitress is all grown up and has moved to London, she sofa surfs and does odd bits of work while trying to find the kind of work she wants. She will only be the teen for one more year and has had enough of Wales.  She decided to stay down south for Christmas and sign-up for Crisis as well. We reunited after a month apart over the kitchen sink where we reconnected and had a great time. The work was hard, fun, tiring, emotional but ultimately the most fulfilling job I’ve ever done. I woke on Tuesday with aching legs and feet, physically drained, tearful, emotional, but still buzzing from a truly epic experience.

IMG_20141227_171428[1]

DSC_0162[1]

DSC_0160[1]

On day one Rosy and I arrived at the gate and within half an hour were changed, and in the kitchen. Lunch service was still ongoing; it looked busy. I was more terrified than if I’d been serving a gourmet wedding breakfast. I didn’t know what to expect.

Mary, the kitchen co-ordinator gave me a very brisk run down of procedure. I hadn’t slept much the night before and really had to hit the ground running to remember everything. Mercifully there wasn’t much evening prep to be done so I got an opportunity to familiarise myself with the kitchen, follow Mary’s lead while getting on with what needed doing.  It wasn’t long before Mary broke the news to me that this was her last day, from Sunday I was the chef in charge and the kitchen co-ordinator. Shit!!!!

Dinner passed without incident but food was sparse towards the end and more people arrived than I’d anticipated. I wanted to make sure both guests (most importantly) and volunteers were able to eat, so as day two arrived I knew we had to make more.

We arrived early and this time a different chef was on duty. I started to plan for dinner as soon as I got in the door, prep needed doing so I distributed tasks among those who had arrived early and those still on duty. I made sure volunteers got a lunch break and then as the evening shift arrived I packed some of them off home. Sunil, the morning chef didn’t seem to want to go and in the end he chose to stay on until the end of the evening admitting he wanted to see how my shift went. He wanted to learn and watch.  This wasn’t the first or last time I felt humbled, or proud of what we as a team achieved during my time at Crisis. With two very experienced assistants (Heather and Dave) plus Sunil, the night flew by and ran smoothly and efficiently and food was plentiful.

Day three on the other hand turned into an 11 hour epic. I’m sure the number of guests rose with every meal. At lunch it was 270. By dinner it was closer to 300, including volunteers.  The team was now familiar with my mission and mantra…cook ‘shit loads’ and my kitchen assistants (an awesome, amazing, hard-working bunch without exception) stepped up to the challenge. They shredded, chopped, grated, mixed, got creative and inspired and accepted that basic food could still be tasty.

DSC_0163[1]

Our team had to prepare for dinner one woman down as Rosy went home sick, and no extra chef in the form of Sunil. It was hard work, we ran it up to the wire but the “Sex Pistols of Balkan brass” the  Trans-Siberian Marching Band distracted the guests with their noisy, chaotic, high energy, hugely entertaining performance and bought us an extra 10 minutes to prep dinner. We were a little late, but nobody was watching the clock that evening.

I’m proud of how well we fed our guests and volunteers. Even at the final hour we managed to find meals for stragglers, like the man who hadn’t eaten in 48 hours brought in by one of the outreach workers. We accommodated extras every day like those from Bermondsey who, rumour had it, came over to Deptford as the food was better!

I met guests and got a hearty thumbs up, Heather told me I HAD to return next year or they would hunt me down and Dave told me that despite how hard it was on the last day I nailed it. Brad told me I “rocked”. Another guest told me it was “Best food all week”,  while another had 6 helpings of pudding! and it was great we were able to give them six helpings!

On the last evening after service finished I took my dinner and sat in the day room. I watched some terrible karaoke, chatted to one of my kitchen assistants who was also homeless and had lived in a caravan for the last couple of years, I finally got a tour of the centre, but never quite got that briefing or debriefing. I only cried on the job once; when a teenage girl who looked like Rosy came to the counter for food. Dishevelled, thin, out of it, I realised how lucky my girl is despite her sofa surfing, to have love, safe places and a choice. I had to leave the counter. I also discovered that many of those at the day centre were not homeless, simply lonely, isolated, in need of company. Having lost a friend two days before Christmas who was lonely and depressed it really hit home how much we need people around us and I felt so priviliged to have such a close group of mates.

My sister told me I’d love it and she wasn’t wrong. What she didn’t tell me was how much I would learn, or how much it would touch and change me. I went home and cried….i’m still shedding tears and its now Thursday.

Crisis doesn’t just help people at Christmas, it helps all year round. If you would like to volunteer find out more here or get involved in the Crisis Skylight projects.

If you spot a rough sleeper in London, or any other city, there is currently SWEP provision (Severe Weather Emergency Protocols) to help find shelter during the cold weather…find out who to contact here

2 Comments

Filed under Christmas, Food issues, Food poverty

The Christmas countdown: Pudding series #2..triple chocolate and brandy

IMG_6751[1]

If you are all about the chocolate, but like the idea of Christmas pudding you can always opt for this ‘fake’ version that includes not one, not two, but three different types of chocolate! It has the rich density of a Christmas pud but without the fruit and are like a cross between a cake, a brownie and a muffin.

They are also quick, straight forward, no fuss and very popular. I prefer to make individual puddings that are generous enough for two (or one person with a very sweet tooth and plenty of room!!)

 

On this occasion I made loads as they also make very nice presents!

Double chocolate chip ‘fake’ Christmas pudding (Makes one 17cm cake, or six very generous ‘puddings’)
150g plain chocolate broken into squares
175g muscovado sugar
120ml double cream
75g butter softened
3 eggs beaten
25g cocoa powder
150g plain flour
100g breadcrumbs
150g white chocolate chips
100g milk chocolate chips
100g mixed peel
Brandy
Grease and line a 17cm cake tin with baking parchment, or grease individual large muffin tins.
In a small pan melt the plain chocolate with the cream and half of the sugar. Beat the remaining sugar, eggs, butter, cocoa and flour until smooth. Stir in the breadcrumbs and chocolate mixture then add the chocolate chips and mixed peel. Stir well. Spoon the mixture into the cake tin (or tins) and bake in a medium oven (180 degrees C / gas mark 4) for 45 minutes. Serve hot with cream or brandy butter.

IMG_6744[1]

Leave a comment

Filed under baking, cakes & Baking, chocolate, Christmas, home cooking, Recipes

The Christmas countdown: Pudding series #1 Date and pecan with salted caramel sauce

christmas food 2014 016
See! It’s not all bah humbug. And so begins a Christmas countdown of my favourite alternative Christmas puddings, especially for those that loathe the traditional, dense fruity stuff.  According to Unilever and Love Food Hate Waste 5 million Christmas puddings get thrown away every year, I’m not sure if this is through over consumption and over enthusiastic purchasing or just because there are a lot of people who don’t like the stuff. Instead why not try something different?

There are plenty of alternatives to Christmas pud that are cheap, easy to make, have as much wow factors as a blazing steamed pudding and will bring many more gasps of appreciation.

To begin this brief, last-minute series one of my all time favourite desserts. Sticky toffee pudding with a twist, and a handful off chopped pecan nuts, a bit of spice and a salted caramel sauce with vanilla salt and there you have it, perfection in a dish.

Sticky date and pecan pudding with salted caramel sauce (makes 6 to 7 puddings, depending on the size of your dishes)

270g dates
50g pecan nuts (chopped)
half a teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
150g unsalted butter
185g self-raising flour
125g soft brown sugar
2 eggs
200g golden granulated sugar
120ml double cream
Vanilla sea salt

Preheat the oven to gas mark 4/180 degrees C. Grease six muffin holes or individual tins.
Place the dates and 250ml water in a saucepan. Bring to the boil then remove from the heat and add the bicarbonate of soda. Add 60g of the butter and stir until melted.

When you add the bicarbonate of soda the pan will fizz. The addition helps soften and 'break down' the dates which may remain a litle hard otherwise

When you add the bicarbonate of soda the pan will fizz. The addition helps soften and ‘break down’ the dates which may remain a litle hard otherwise

Sift the flour into a large bowl, then add 125g of the sugar and stir well. Add the date mixture and egg and stir well. In the bottom the dishes add enough pecan nuts to make a pattern then spoon over the batter and bake for 20 minutes.
christmas food 2014 007
christmas food 2014 009
christmas food 2014 011
For the caramel sauce place the granulated sugar in a heavy based saucepan and cook over a medium heat stirring constantly until it turns into a thick amber coloured liquid. Once you reach this point all the sugar should have melted so you can stir in the remaining 90g of butter, still stirring constantly. Then trickle in the cream whisking as you do. The mixture will spit and bubble rapidly. Boil for 1 minute, it will rise in the pan as it does so make sure it doesn’t boil over. Stir in a teaspoon of vanilla salt and allow to cool slightly.

Leave a comment

Filed under baking, cakes & Baking, Christmas, Christmas menu's, home cooking, Recipes

…hello 2014!..Favourite recipes and future plans

my green man 361

Hello and happy new year! Welcome to the first day of 2014, a day of new beginnings, plans and looking forward.

After the turmoil of the latter half of 2013 I spent new years eve quietly. Eighteen years ago yesterday my daughter was born: eleven twenty, new years eve, 1995. My one and only plan for the day was to spend as much time as I could with her, opening presents, drinking champagne and eating cake, before she went off partying with her mates. New years eve is a hard time to have a birthday, so we have saved our celebrations until next weekend. Other than that I wanted to hang out with my son. It was a great day, we drank and made merry, but I really didn’t have the urge to go partying afterwards. Instead I listened to the fireworks at midnight from the comfort of my bed and a good book.

This has been a hard year in many ways. With work commitments and business building, juggling finances and making difficult and painful decisions my feet have barely touched the ground. Its been a year of buckling down. This has left little time for relaxation…(this year I need to figure in a bit more of that). Sadly, I feel that many of the highlights of my year were overshadowed by difficulties I’ve had to face…but still, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed working with some lovely, amazing people, being part of some great food events, and being given an opportunity to get paid for my writing! These were my highlights.

recipe testing for food article 021

I’ve travelled a lot around Britain, cooked on a huge scale, trained, demo-ed, mentored and employed.

1234306_591423230910092_974008166_n

DSC_2009

Abergavenny Food Festival 2013 015

I’ve cooked at home and for myself less, written less and spent less time developing new recipes. That hasn’t stopped readers following the blog. My most viewed recipes of 2013 were all ones written and posted over the past year; the top three were for perfect falafel, egg-free cheesecake and my mum’s now famous smoked mackerel pate. I want to give more time to writing in 2014, to cooking and working on new recipes and looking at starting on a book. Not a standard recipe book, but something more related to food stories.

DSC02068

supper club etc 0311

green man 2013 085

Nonn & Chris wedding etc 023

So what’s in store for 2014? I have so many ideas and plans that I’m still trying to get to grips with what is do-able. What I do know is that I like being my own boss, but at the same time I am a social creature who works best with other creative people throwing in their ideas, inspiration and talents. I don’t have the time or the energy to do it all. So, this year will see more collaboration.

I am also scuppered since I lost my home and my business; so rather than running a regular supper club (which I can’t do in the house I am currently renting) I am planning ten exciting pop-up events in different (secret) locations, with interesting menu’s and different people taking the helm at front of house. These may include visiting chefs, music, amazing decor, or some kind of installation…..watch this space for dates.

I did a lot of cooking in other people’s homes this year and that will continue, as will my current ‘residency’ at The Oyster Catcher in Rhosneigr. Incidentally the other two most popular posts from 2013 are related to visits here (The Oyster Catcher project) or events which involved their staff and cadet chefs (A salty, sea food pop-up….run by Eamon Fullalove, former motivational chef at the project).

menai seafood 108

oyster catcher 029

In 2013 I employed a full-time chef. Mark Burns worked with me through the crazy summer period, then as business tailed off I helped him get some work experience with other local restaurants. As Christmas approached and his contract was due to end he secured himself a full-time, permanent post in The Black House Grill in Chester. A successful outcome and one we were both very happy with! This year may see new additions to my team, which is pretty huge now! I’m overwhelmed at how many people want to work with me on jobs (chefs and waitresses) and they are all fantastic! But a personal assistant is probably what I need most!

Nonn & Chris wedding etc 010

green man 2013 227

We will also be getting a new ‘look’. For the latter part of 2013 I have worked with a very talented art director who has tried to brand me!! Not an easy job and I have been very specific about my desires. Nina Farrell art directed Felicity Cloakes book Perfect so I’m in very good hands and she’s done a great job! The new look is all set to launch this month…so watch this space.

Finally, a big thank you to everyone who has supported me, booked me, stuck with me, trusted me, eaten my food, enjoyed my recipes, read my blog, cut me slack when life has been hard and made me smile with their lovely comments. I appreciate you all.

Keep coming back; comment more (its nice to read what people think) and have a wonderful 2014 🙂 xx

Leave a comment

Filed under Christmas, Food festival, in the press, photography, Recipes

Adore Naturals Christmas ebook and other stories

Hello hello!! Yes I’m still here despite going AWOL for a while. Looking at the blog the other day I realised I hadn’t written or posted for a whole month! That’s a long time without writing for me.

There are significant reasons for my sluggishness. Writers block is not something to be forced away, or overcome easily especially when life is already full to the point of bursting.  I guess that’s the point; life has been at the point of bursting and so many other things have taken precedence over the writing (which I love, but it doesn’t pay the bills!!).

So, its cooking, eating, attending food events and training that have kept me busy, while the stormy seas of life raged around me. I know I don’t do things by halves, but this month I’ve experienced more than my fair share of major life changing events. These are the things that have taken over my thoughts and time. Separation from my partner after twenty years has been a traumatic wrench along with, a house move and a new chapter in my life as a chef.

Although for now supper club is on hold, I’ve suddenly found myself back in a restaurant after more than twenty years this time as pastry chef at The Oyster Catcher training academy, a role that also involves cooking for the restaurant,  training and mentoring the cadets.  I’ve also been all over the place with cookery demo’s…Conwy, Portmeirion, Abergavenny which also meant little time spent in my new house.

Abergavenny Food Festival 2013 013

One piece of writing I did manage to concentrate on was a commission by Adore Naturals. Their festive guide to a natural, stress free Christmas includes ideas for making home-made gifts, family craft projects, health tips, perfect presents and my vegetarian Christmas dinner menu. The book went ‘live’ a while ago and you can access it here if you are looking for last minute inspiration

Adore_Christmas_eBook

The dessert recipe was recently trialled on the specials menu at The Oyster Catcher and was a bit of a hit!

recipe testing for food article 021

Beetroot tatin with goats cheese and balsamic glaze from the Adore Christmas ebook and it can be found here

recipe testing for food article 027

A rather melted mincemeat and marzipan parfait…studio lights and all that with orange and cinnamon syrup

For now I’m sad to say that supper club is having a break, although I am still cooking private dinners at different locations and am available for private bookings. Don’t worry though, it’s not a permanent break…just to give me enough time to take a breather while I regroup, review where I’m going with business and work out our next move for 2014. Exciting ideas are flying about…collaborations, new venues and opportunities….all I can say is have a great Christmas and watch this space closely!

Leave a comment

Filed under British food, Christmas, Christmas menu's, Food festival, home cooking, in the press, local produce, recipe books, Recipes

A very happy Christmas to you all

DSC02283

So here it is at last, Christmas is finally upon us. Having had it thrust in our faces for the past two months it reached its crescendo on Black Friday with a mass of work do’s, parties and gatherings which left me feeling as if I’d peaked too soon. Saturday was a quieter affair while Sunday and Monday became days for recovery and baking.  Glittery bite sized star meringues, orange cranberry and cinnamon muffins (for breakfast in the morning), chocolate salami and small trays of lemon drizzle cake make perfect presents and when wrapped in pretty paper or cellophane there’s nothing shop bought that could beat them.

As there are only four of us at home we went for a turkey crown (from my local butcher)rather than the full blown beast, pigs in blankets, chestnut stuffing, the works! Smoked salmon from Derimon and tiny bantam egg salad with home-made blinis, rocket and a chive and creme fraiche dressing will start proceedings and to finish it had to be a Buche de Noel, or chocolate log if like me you can’t be bothered with all that fancy terminology!). My version is like a cross between a chocolate log and a black forest swiss roll!

DSC02281

Now it’s Christmas Eve;  I’ve battled and survived the six parties, the Christmas baking, the odd birthday party, the shopping and pressy wrapping and the over excited and annoying child, the sickly teenager and all while nursing a slipped disc in my neck. Cocodamol and a stiff Bailey’s have kept me  going and while I may have seemed like an over medicated Nigella, the fact I am now calmly writing this and wishing you all a Happy Christmas means that it is miraculously calm in the Moel Faban house.

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under cakes & Baking, Christmas, Christmas menu's

There’s nothing like home made Christmas pudding

The little un and me showing off our puddings

Everyone is talking about stir-up Sunday…that is, the last Sunday before Advent begins and the traditional day for making the families Christmas pud. I know we’ve just missed it but really it’s not too late. If you can manage it this weekend here is my traditional pudding recipe which I have used for years, well ever since I moved to Wales which is twenty odd years ago. It is a recipe I adapted from one found in a really old Sainsburys recipe book. My Mum’s from back in the 80’s I think.

Sift 175g (6oz) plain flour, 2 teaspoons ground mixed spice, 1 generous teaspoon cinnamon and half a teaspoon grated nutmeg into a large bowl. Mix in 175g (6oz) fresh brown breadcrumbs then rub in 175g (6oz) softened butter.

Stir in 175g (6oz) soft brown sugar, 350g (12oz) sultanas, 250g (8oz) raisins, the same amount of currants and 75g (3oz) mixed peel. Add the grated rind and juice of one orange, 2 beaten eggs and 120ml of brown ale (or stout). Give it a good mix, don’t forget to have a wish and then turn it into a greased 1.75litre (3 pint) pudding basin (or two smaller ones like we did). Cover with a pudding cloth or greaseproof paper and a sheet of foil pleated in the middle and tied on with string. Steam for 6 hours topping up the water as necessary.

Allow to cool and then replace the greaseproof paper and foil with fresh and store in a cool dry place. Christmas puddings can be made up to 4 months in advance and they tend to get better with time. Much better than anything from a supermarket I have to say.

When THAT day comes round and you are ready to eat your pudding, steam again for about 2 hours, turn out on to a warm dish, douse well with warm brandy and then ignite.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under baking, British food, cakes & Baking, Christmas, Christmas menu's, home cooking, Recipes, seasonal food

All I want for Christmas….

I hadn’t really thought about Christmas until I rolled up at the local produce market yesterday. As I scanned the stalls it suddenly dawned on me that it is actually getting close! Hand made baubles and decorations, Christmas cards and all nature of gifts adorned the craft stalls, while cake sellers displayed mince pies and Christmas cookies.

It started me thinking about pressie buying, Christmas lists and what I might get for my other food loving friends. Now I’m sure everyone has their very own ‘wish list’ desires that sit like untouchable gems in their imagination, while we share the more practical and attainable suggestions with family and friends. I definitely do.

I share my own Christmas shopping between local suppliers and artists, do some online buying and make lots of my own handmade goods. If I’m buying online I like to have a browse on Etsy. For those who’ve not yet discovered Etsy it is an online craft market which hosts lots of little shops selling a huge variety of arts, crafts, handmade and vintage items with prices to suit every wallet. Here are a few of my Christmas likes and wish list items: From kitchen kit to quirky food gifts….with a few cards and decorations thrown in for good measure.

If you like collecting vintage kitchen ware (as I do) Kitchen Culineria has a wide range to choose from. This gorgeous set of highly collectible Tupperware caught my eye!

If you are ready to buy now and can get your order in early enough I reckon there is time to pick up some beautiful American folksy items like this plate from Owl Creek Ceramics. Even though they are USA based, like most Etsy sellers they offer international rates. This plate costs about nineteen quid ($30)

If you are after something more modern then look no further than Joseph Joseph. They stock a vast array of household goods in bright eye-catching colours. This bowl set would suit any student (or anyone else come to think of it) setting up their own place and at £20 they won’t break the bank.

If the bowls aren’t quite cool enough for the average teen try browsing Suck UK. Their range of teen and student friendly gifts (everything from kitchen ware to general silliness) should put a smile on anyone’s face. I like this ceramic noodle cup which always makes me think of my teenager and her reliance on supernoodles as a main sustenance in life….this may find its way into her Christmas stocking and at £10 its not at all expensive.

Closer to home there are gifts a plenty. I’m sorely tempted by this cobalt blue hand blown salt bowl with pewter spoon by Halen Mon, the makers of fine Welsh sea salt. I’m not a great fan of salt cellars and this makes a beautiful elegant alternative. It comes with 100g of their own sea salt which at £27.50 makes it a great gift.

I am also madly in love with Grasi’s products and have long coveted one of their gorgeous Welsh slate cheese boards. I bought my mum one for Christmas last year and she loves it. Its beautiful and every one is different thanks to the unique quality of the slate. I borrowed it to serve canapes on at Global Feast his year. It was much admired and I was loath to give it back! I really must get myself one. This one costs £30 and is available from Not on The High Street

If you have a higher budget to play with then this Beng EK clock from Cooks paraphernalia is the perfect gift. Combining stylish clock with integral (but detachable) kitchen timer its a busy cooks dream. At £64.95 it’s not cheap. Nor is this Magimix Le Mini Plus. At £140.00 it is very much a ‘wish-list’ item but if you are looking to splash out this is a fantastic gadget for an enthusiastic domestic cook. I couldn’t live without my industrial sized machine but this one is small, compact, multifunctional and stylish. It comes in a range of colours and is a Which? BEST BUY and one of the Independent’s 50 best gadgets.

Going back to the student/teen market, forget the store-bought commercial chocolate and indulge them in some hand-made artisan stuff. This chocolate ‘pizza’ made by Welsh artisan chocolatiers Aballu would be right up their street! Its 10 inches round and costs £12.99. You can design your own too!

 

It’s not food related in any way but I spotted this while browsing Etsy. More a reflection on my family life! This US import from Huckleberry Hollow designs  would make the perfect gift for that eccentric family  (or just keep it for yourself!)

More Christmas paraphernalia from Dyfal Donc, one of my local market stalls who also have an Etsy shop. Check out their quirky, off the wall, collage style range of cards, badges and magnets. They also make jewelery with the same vintage style.

Last, but not least are these beautiful porcelain tree decorations from Miss Marple Makes, another Etsy seller. I haven’t seen this on her shop yet, just her blog but I know they are coming and I think I will be getting a few!

Hope this gives you a few ideas…happy Christmas shopping!

1 Comment

Filed under Christmas, Uncategorized

Chocolate salami

I first came across chocolate salami at my Grandad’s 90th birthday party of all places! For once I wasn’t doing the catering, so got to sample the lovely grub created by the son of a friend and one of the things he made was this. I think I polished most of it off myself!

Despite the name it contains no meat and needs minimal cooking. It is simple, Christmassy and makes an unusual accompaniment to coffee at the end of a meal.

The sweet creation is traditional in Italy and Portugal and it also made an interesting talking point for all the ‘oldies’ at Grandad’s party. I overheard one lady say “I don’t usually like salami, but this was very nice”

Recipe:

80g unsalted butter

200g bitter chocolate 70%

100g icing sugar

200g digestive biscuits

80g flaked almonds

80g dried cranberries

80g pistachios

2 egg yolks

80g Port

2ml vanilla essence

80g  Condensed milk

Pinch of salt

Cocoa powder for coating

Crush the Biscuits into small pieces, but not crumbs. Mix with the almonds, cranberries and pistachios and sprinkle half of the port over the mixture, set aside.

Melt chocolate and butter in a metal bowl, placed over a pot of simmering water. Once melted add the icing sugar, salt, egg yolks, the rest of the port, vanilla and condensed milk, mix well and continue to cook over the bain-marie for a further 4 minutes to cook the eggs, stirring regularly.

Remove from the heat and stir in the biscuit mixture mixing well. Leave the mixture to cool for about 10 – 15 minutes, this will make it easier to shape as it will thicken and set.  Shape it into a salami shape roll between a double layer of cling film. Put into the fridge to set overnight. Remove the cling film and roll the salami in cocoa powder. Wrap ready for serving in a sheet of greaseproof paper and tie the ends with string, just as a salami would be wrapped. Serve with good strong coffee by cutting on the diagonal.

Not all recipes use nuts and fruit, but i really liked this one and it gave it that Christmassy feel with the addition of cranberries.

Leave a comment

Filed under cakes & Baking, Christmas, home cooking, Italian food, Recipes