The Christmas countdown: Pudding series #1 Date and pecan with salted caramel sauce

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See! It’s not all bah humbug. And so begins a Christmas countdown of my favourite alternative Christmas puddings, especially for those that loathe the traditional, dense fruity stuff.  According to Unilever and Love Food Hate Waste 5 million Christmas puddings get thrown away every year, I’m not sure if this is through over consumption and over enthusiastic purchasing or just because there are a lot of people who don’t like the stuff. Instead why not try something different?

There are plenty of alternatives to Christmas pud that are cheap, easy to make, have as much wow factors as a blazing steamed pudding and will bring many more gasps of appreciation.

To begin this brief, last-minute series one of my all time favourite desserts. Sticky toffee pudding with a twist, and a handful off chopped pecan nuts, a bit of spice and a salted caramel sauce with vanilla salt and there you have it, perfection in a dish.

Sticky date and pecan pudding with salted caramel sauce (makes 6 to 7 puddings, depending on the size of your dishes)

270g dates
50g pecan nuts (chopped)
half a teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
150g unsalted butter
185g self-raising flour
125g soft brown sugar
2 eggs
200g golden granulated sugar
120ml double cream
Vanilla sea salt

Preheat the oven to gas mark 4/180 degrees C. Grease six muffin holes or individual tins.
Place the dates and 250ml water in a saucepan. Bring to the boil then remove from the heat and add the bicarbonate of soda. Add 60g of the butter and stir until melted.

When you add the bicarbonate of soda the pan will fizz. The addition helps soften and 'break down' the dates which may remain a litle hard otherwise

When you add the bicarbonate of soda the pan will fizz. The addition helps soften and ‘break down’ the dates which may remain a litle hard otherwise

Sift the flour into a large bowl, then add 125g of the sugar and stir well. Add the date mixture and egg and stir well. In the bottom the dishes add enough pecan nuts to make a pattern then spoon over the batter and bake for 20 minutes.
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For the caramel sauce place the granulated sugar in a heavy based saucepan and cook over a medium heat stirring constantly until it turns into a thick amber coloured liquid. Once you reach this point all the sugar should have melted so you can stir in the remaining 90g of butter, still stirring constantly. Then trickle in the cream whisking as you do. The mixture will spit and bubble rapidly. Boil for 1 minute, it will rise in the pan as it does so make sure it doesn’t boil over. Stir in a teaspoon of vanilla salt and allow to cool slightly.

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Food Bank Britain: who isn’t eating?

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Image courtesy of the Trussell Trust

This might read like one of those bah humbug kind of posts, it’s not supposed to be one, but as Christmas creeps closer I’ve begun to look back over the past year and realised that a lot of things are not right in the world.

Perhaps with my change of circumstances, both for the good and bad, I’ve become more acutely aware of the huge inequalities within the industry that I work in. I’ve found it increasingly difficult to reconcile my feelings about the gulf between have’s and have-nots. Those that can afford good food and those who can’t…as if eating good food is only a right for those with money.

I’m going to go off on bit of a tangent here. About a  month ago I read a headline in the Guardian “Move over ‘poverty porn’ … is it the era of ‘prosperity porn’?” The whole concept of ‘poverty porn’ disgusted me to begin with. The idea that we watch poor people on our TV for ‘entertainment’, like it’s a dirty pleasure, but then another thought dawned on me. Why don’t people want to watch programmes about the poor anymore? Is it because there are a growing number of people in Britain  living in poverty. Everyday working people, those unemployed through no fault of their own and not the ‘dole scum’ they like to portray. People are beginning to empathise with the people in those programmes. They are beginning to understand what it is like to struggle. Is this perhaps the reason for the switch? A subtle government ploy to change the message? Now more people than ever are living in poverty the focus is shifted elsewhere. Where once we laughed at the poor now we’re being encouraged to laugh at the rich.

You can call me a conspiracy theorist, and I might not be correct in my assumption, but you can’t argue that the media is full of disingenuous information about how the economy is improving, shallow programmes that dumb us down and make us forget to focus on the things we should be angry about, the awful things happening in the real world, and who created the mess in this country.

Despite my education I’ve never been rich. I learned that critical opinion, morality, intellectual achievement was more valuable than money. I learned the lessons the hard way. I grew up on a council estate in a family of activists. I frequented the picket line while my parents shouted scab at strike breakers. As their strike dragged on into its sixth month and employees lost their pay we suffered extreme poverty. I have memories of scouring the fridge for anything to eat, asking when shopping would be done and being told not this week. We had no money. I’m almost convinced we even had to hide from a debt collector knocking on the door once. As growing teenagers we were hungry, but we never starved because we were lucky, my mother knew how to cook and make do. Generations after the 1980’s are even deprived of that skill since cooking, sewing etc were no longer considered as ‘life skills’.

So back to the point, I’m getting a bit sick of the TV food industry where a bunch of wannabe’s take part in reality cookery shows (yes I did it, I hold my hands up, guilty as charged..but it wasn’t for fame, that was the last thing on my mind, it was just for the hell of it, for the experience). There are hundreds of cookery programmes on the TV and chefs are ‘celebrities’. Were not. We make nice food for those that can afford it. The viewers of these TV shows include a host of people who happily live off ready meals, takeaways, junk food and haven’t a clue how to cook, or are not able to afford the ingredients to emulate the TV chefs dishes.

This is the way I see things….

  • Supermarkets sell masses of unnecessary food at inflated prices (we know this because you only have to look at Aldi and Lidl to know that it can be cheaper)
  • Advertising props up the idea that you need ‘convenience food’
  • Schools do not teach basic cooking skills, these lessons were not considered core skills and so were abolished by the conservative government in the 1990’s
  • Supermarkets link up with schemes like Fareshare to make themselves look better, to improve their profile by ‘helping’ the community. This is because their profits have dropped, not out of any sense of altruism or genuine caring
  • Many food banks are based in supermarkets where its the community, the people who are struggling, that are buying extra things to ‘donate’ not the supermarket giving freely
  • On top of this supermarkets are making it harder and harder to retrieve discarded food from the skips. In my area supermarkets tip bleach on what would be perfectly edible food, and hide it behind gates with razor wire and locks. Once upon a time students and the skint would have lived off this, now it just goes to landfill.
  • Supermarkets give very little to the local food banks and skips are still full of perfectly useable food.

Figures from the Trussell Trust, between April 1st 2013 and April 1st 2014 913,138 people were given 3 days emergency food rations. This is three times the number of people receiving aid in 2012-2013 and one can only imagine what the figures will be for 2014-2015. While The Real Junk Food Project cafe based in Leeds reports that they have intercepted 11.8 tons of food since March 2013, which has created 3338 meals served in their Pay as You Feel cafe (Dec 13′-July 14′).

I paid a visit to my local food bank where I spoke with Helen Roberts, part-time village post mistress, volunteer food bank organiser and do-er of other ‘random’ jobs. She co-ordinates the food bank at Bangor Cathedral, my nearest city, which is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday afternoons. I visited on a Friday to find out about how they distribute emergency food.  I was early so sat in one of the pews watching the silent bustle of the volunteers preparing to open and packing numerous carrier bags with 3 days worth of food.

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A volunteer packing emergency supplies bags

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Volunteers sorting produce at the Cathedral

Helen reported a steady increase in users since they opened. Usually agencies helping people with other issues such as homelessness (Shelter Cymru), mental health problems (Community Mental Health Trust), housing issues (North Wales housing) or substance misuse problems (CAIS or NACRO) will make a referral to the food bank. Individuals are given vouchers which entitles them to either a family pack or a single persons pack containing three days of emergency rations. Depending on circumstances this maybe supplemented, such as, where there are more children in the family.

There is also a growing number of people arriving with no voucher. They are walk-ins that stop by because they are struggling at a particular time. Some of these are working people who for one reason or another find themselves in difficulty. They are never turned away. In these cases they are given a letter which entitles them to a further three days emergency food but usually they are also signposted to another service if necessary.

One of the problems with the service is that food packs only contain ‘ambient’ goods (so no fresh, chilled or frozen produce). Goods such as breakfast cereal, UHT milk, a variety of tins with sandwich fillings that can be used for lunch such as corned beef, tuna, bread and margarine, plus the ingredients for 3 main meals (tinned meat, chicken).

What shocked me the most was that food is mostly bought for these parcels. In the past the food bank received deliveries from the CREST Co-operative Fareshare service. Fareshare is an organisation which works with partners in the food industry securing surplus food and delivering it to a variety of community projects and charities across the UK. Sadly, although the service was only established in 2010 it has now been discontinued. According to Anna Hughes the marketing manager for Crest the operation was ‘not sustainable’ in North Wales and not enough groups had joined. Organisations wishing to receive deliveries from the service paid a £500 yearly membership fee which helped cover the costs of staff, fuel, deliveries and other overheads. Some of these community groups are now left without regular donations (like the Bangor Foodbank) while others access the service that runs out of the Wirral. I mentioned to Anna that it was a shame the service had closed now that there was a greater need for it and she agreed, although it was a decision made by the directors of the organisation. Perhaps such a large annual fee was off-putting for local community groups, who knows. I just think it is a shame there is no Fare share service here in North Wales at all.

I talked to volunteers and sat for a while quietly observing the steady stream of ‘customers’ arriving. They weren’t queuing around the block like they might in a bigger city, but there were plenty needing help, some of whom I knew by sight some people were collecting for others who weren’t able to get to the Cathedral.  It saddened me and made me thankful that I do know how to cook well and know how to make-do with very little. Whole generations of children and young adults are growing up in Britain watching their working parents struggling to put food on the table, struggling to know how to make a meal and not knowing how to manage on an ever decreasing income.

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One visitor collecting supplies for a neighbour

So what’s my solution? I know, it’s not easy…but I would push for the following…

Proper cookery, budgeting and nutrition lessons in schools would be a start. Follow that up with affordable fresh food all the time as a right, not a privilege. Go back to the days of buying from markets, small producers and greengrocers (remember them?). Buy meat from the butcher in smaller quantities, bread from a bakery. Do I sound old-fashioned? Well they did seem to get some things right back in the post war era where people came before profits and we all lived in a community. Perhaps its only now people are beginning to realise this..

So I am putting my money where my mouth is. In the coming months I will be telling you about a new project I am starting up under the umbrella of The Real Junk Food Project…a community, pay as you feel cafe using diverted produce.. keep watching this space, I’ve a long way to go yet.

In the meantime…donate food if you can, buy local, help your community. That is all.

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STOP PRESS: Exciting Competition Announcement for local cooks and chefs (Gwynedd and Ynys Mon)

Here is that exciting announcement I mentioned on Friday.

For all amateur chefs & cooks in Gwynedd or Ynys Mon I just want you to know that I am working with FLAG (fisheries local action group) and Menter Mon on a project to promote local seafood. As part of this we are holding a competition which will offer 20 lucky cooks the opportunity to win £100 to hold their own seafood themed ‘supper club’ (for friends, family or even total strangers if you wish!) plus the chance to attend a one day seafood master class with local seafood experts hosted at the Food Technology Centre, Coleg Menai

To qualify for this competition you must be a resident of Ynys Mon or Gwynedd, not be a professional chef working in the industry locally, be keen to use and learn more about local seafood, and enjoy cooking and entertaining…that’s it!

For further information and an application form where you can tell us why you would love to participate in this project, please email me at moelfabansuppers@gmail.com

Thanks and good luck!

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Food waste and Bristol Skipchen

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In May 2009 I was made redundant. I suspect many of you readers will already know this and it’s no secret that I started writing this blog and running my supper club as something fun to do while searching for a job.  What you may not know are the realities of living on a suddenly reduced income. Within six months I dropped from a very cosy salary of £30,000 a year as a health psychologist, to £72.40 a week income based job seekers allowance (once the redundancy money and ad hoc freelance work dried up).  This was before my marriage ended and my husband and I still lived together. He was working full-time and had a similar wage, which should be pretty good, but once you factor in all the trappings of the ‘middle-class’ professional lifestyle; hefty mortgage which he had to take over paying, credit card payments, household bills plus two hefty overdrafts (which we could no longer afford to pay off), the descent into debt and virtual poverty was swift. This is how people end up bankrupt and homeless. At one point my monthly bank charges topped £150 because I couldn’t pay in enough money to cut my overdraft. The wonderful HSBC bank refused to freeze the account, or stop charging me, which compounded my woe month on month.

Advisors from the CAB told us the only way to freeze charges and cut payments was to default (except the mortgage, council tax and utilities). They told us that store card companies couldn’t make us pay and couldn’t send around bailiffs. Luckily we didn’t lose the house, we kept paying the essentials but we did default. It was stressful and we still struggled to keep our heads above water, often not having enough money to put fuel in the car or buy food for the family. It was scary how all that could happen. I have a PhD,  but I couldn’t get a job. I was skint. I now have a terrible credit rating, but have learned what is important in life, what I can live without and just how precarious that capitalist lifestyle is.

I joined forces with my friend Sophie who was in similarly dire straights. Sophie relied on the tried and tested student practise of ‘skipping’ as a way to top up her food cupboards.  Skipping, for those not aware, is where people collect discarded supermarket food from the skips and use it to feed themselves. Technically its illegal (although not as immoral as chucking away perfectly good food or throwing bleach or rat poison over the contents of the skips so people can’t raid them and use the food…which happened in my area) and many supermarkets now keep their ‘discarded’ food under lock and key. Of course this makes it incredibly difficult to make use of the rejected goods, 90% of which is perfectly edible, safe and reusable.

With food banks, foodcycle, and soup kitchens on the increase, it’s not just those on benefits who are struggling to feed their family.  Barnardos reports that there are around 3.5 million children living in poverty in the UK (almost a third of all children) with 1.6 million in severe poverty . In the UK 63% of children living in poverty are in a family where someone works. There is a massive discrepancy in income, living conditions, outlook, perceptions, and I have lived this myself.

But it’s not just about food poverty, it’s about the relentlessly wasteful planet we now inhabit, the supermarket controlled world that has drained people of their cash (don’t kid yourself, everything is over priced, even those things they tell you are on ‘special offer’, you only need to take a trip to Aldi or Lidl to see that) and their common sense when it comes to buying food.  This has long been one of my favourite soap-box subjects and food rants (along with no cookery in schools), but I’m not the only one banging this particular drum, enter The Real Junk Food Project.

According to their figures around 1.3 billion tons of food gets thrown away globally each year. This amounts to nearly 40% of global production. 40%!!! That’s huge. Unimaginable. In the UK alone we waste around 15 million tons of food a year and this is predominantly due to stringent and confusing food safety legislation.

The Real Junk Food Project began life in February 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. Founders and co-directors Adam Smith and Johanna Hewitt were horrified by the amount of food waste they came across so set up pay-by-the-minute barbeques on the banks of the River Yarrow using discarded food. Later, when parenthood beckoned, they felt the lure to return home and back to Adam’s home town of Leeds with the aim of continuing the project. They hunted about, found lots of support and were finally offered  access to a struggling community kitchen in Armley, a particularly deprived part of Leeds. Meanwhile, at a local food activist meeting Sam and Conor (co-directors to-be) heard about the project. They too were  making their own discoveries about commercial food waste as they, and a cohort of other friends from university dined on the proceeds of supermarket bin raids. They heard about the project and approached Adam and Jo with food to exchange and a relationship was formed.

The Leeds Skipchen opened its doors for its first trial in December 2013 when the couple cooked Christmas dinner for the homeless population of Leeds. In the same month it became a Community Interest Company and has thrived and grown since sparking support and interest from all sectors. Now open 7 days a week the project is spreading and growing; new cafe’s are popping up across Leeds…and now, this, the first one in Bristol.

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The other interesting feature of the Skipchen is the Pay-as-you-feel (PAYF) policy. This is what their website says about it. I couldn’t have put it any better, so over to them….

As well as the positive environmental impacts of reducing edible food waste the project also has clear social benefits through operating a strictly Pay-as-you-feel (PAYF) policy . PAYF offers an alternative to the conventional the payment system as there is no price on any produce of the café. Our system transcends monetary transactions and liberates people to use their skills and attributes as well as money to pay for their meals. Furthermore, we aim to highlight the absurdity that the produce we use has been stripped of its monetary value but still retains its nutritional value. By making people think about what they wish to contribute for their meals, the idea is to get society thinking about how they value food as a resource.

The pay-as-you-feel policy makes sense and takes me back to the early days of supper club, when we asked for donations. Later, this later changed to ‘suggested’ donations because people needed more guidance, they wanted to know ‘how much’ was OK. Although the supper club is based on a different concept (I was buying top quality ingredients for those evenings which was in fact pretty much the only time I did any proper shopping) and costs had to be covered, it was still a not for profit exercise. I liked being able to offer people a restaurant experience without charging the earth, bringing in customers that wouldn’t normally go to a top flight restaurant, making them feel welcome and relaxed, where hippies with dreadlocks could sit next to university lecturers and all would get on and find common ground.

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So, on a damp Wednesday afternoon five of us plus a baby in a pram jostled for space and a place to sit inside the busy Bristol Skipchen. Initially we dithered, confused, trying to work out what was the skipchen cafe menu and what belonged to the bar that ‘loans’ them space during the day. Once we’d sussed it out we chose a variety of dishes; vegeburgers, salad with mozzarella and a lovely lime dressing, watercress and spring onion soup, roast cauliflower. The cafe was happily chaotic with a vibrant group of diners leaving the counter with loaded plates of everything. I guess that for some this may well be their main, or only meal of the day. Conversation about the project surrounded us, and there seemed to be a keen interest locally.

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I spoke to Sam who runs the Bristol Skipchen and he told me how it worked. He emphasised two points; first that the project is independent of the big supermarkets. Food Cycle and many food banks, are run in conjunction with, or hosted by supermarkets…ironic since they are the ones that create the problems in the first place. By staying free of their input its easier to challenge their stranglehold. Second, it deliberately avoids the supermarket skips around Bristol which are already used by many of the cities homeless population.

Food donations come from a variety of sources; a local homeless hostel that receives a surplus, a restaurant that over ordered mozzarella, a food PR company that couldn’t use a whole box of watercress, and is sometimes topped up with discards collected from skips in more affluent areas outside of Bristol, where the food would simply be thrown away.

Bristol Skipchen is run by volunteers, all young, enthusiastic and committed food activists and has a lets all-muck-in-and-help-yourself kind of feel to it, which is what they hope to encourage. I love that the Pay As You Feel policy got us all talking, discussing what we’d eaten, what we thought the food was worth, weighing up the time and skill put into its preparation, using our judgement and what we could afford (my visit took place whilst on a severely pared down budget). Some visitors there can’t afford anything, and in that way its fantastic for providing a square meal. We could afford to pay, so did so according to our means. We loved it; the concept, the buzz, the enthusiasm and the commitment. It was good to see it busy. The food was pretty good, if not cooked with total gastronomic expertise (sorry, I’m a chef and hard to please 100%) and there was plenty of it.

One of our group was my eleven year old son. Initially bewildered and perhaps slightly disgusted by the concept of eating food reclaimed from bins, he soon understood what it was all about, realised that I’d given him reclaimed food at home and so tucked into his lunch with no more hesitation. We were sad that there was no pudding, but they have to work with what they’ve been given  (a donation of cake ingredients please). So thankyou The Real Junk Food Project and Bristol Skipchen, you have restored my faith in human nature just when I’d given up hope, and you’ve inspired me. So yes, I will be returning there. Soon I hope and perhaps  the other side of the counter. I will make cake.

Bristol Skipchen is based in the Stokes Croft district of Bristol. Give them your support and your food donations and they will give you a delicious lunch.

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A final look at Ludlow Food Festival…the bits I didn’t show you before

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The Inner bailey, Ludlow Food Festival

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the teen…if she gets stroppy

The teen and I saw and did a lot more than just get high on coffee at last months visit to Ludlow Food Festival. From Egyptian and Indian cooking to the sampling of a variety of wonderful products (everything from smoky cheese to absinthe marzipan and hot chocolate recipes from the 1600’s) we pretty much did it all.

As a food festival organiser it’s always great to get out and see how others do it. No, its more than great, its essential and not just as a demonstrator but also as a guest, as I was on this occasion. The one problem with running a food festival is that you never get an opportunity to really get out and see what’s happening ‘on the streets’, this is why I also really enjoy visiting food festivals (and I’ve been to a few!). They all have their own character and personality, whether small or large they all have something slightly different and distinctive about them. As an example, Conwy Feast (where I am demoing next Saturday) has the arts and lights programme, late night live music and a harbourside setting, Ludlow is in the castle itself and although it doesn’t have music, it does have a variety of daytime workshops and classes all based within the castle walls. Abergavenny has a bit of everything! All these different facets help keep them fresh and up to date.

This is most noticeable in the case of festivals like Ludlow and Abergavenny that have run a while. Our Menai Seafood Festival is a baby compared to twenty year old Ludlow, or even seventeen year old Llangollen, which despite being a lot smaller than the others, plays to that strength.

The longer established festivals are more polished, confident and often a bit more adventurous. They know who they are and what they are doing which in the case of Ludlow, is why it can successfully run for three days and still pull in the crowds (which total around 20,000 over the weekend).

Friday is the day that most media and catering professionals visit. Dubbed ‘top chef’ Friday its the day the bigger names appear. This year chefs included one of the UK’s top female chefs Emily WatkinsDaniel Doherty , private chef Frank Pontais (who we caught the tail end of) and Ed Kimber (The Boy Who Bakes) who gave a French patisserie demo on the Graeme Kidd demo stage. It was late in the day when we arrived and after Ed’s demo we just had time for a short wander around,  booking into Saturday’s workshops and generally doing a bit of a recce. By the end of the day we’d planned our Saturday agenda, so sloped off for a bit of dinner at the newly opened Wildwood Kitchen. We were lucky, we hadn’t booked a table anywhere and predictably most of the restaurants were full. The Wildwood had space, possibly because it was so new. It felt new, but the food while not being wildly inventive (it may have been a special ‘festival’ menu), was tasty. The teen and I weren’t taken by many of the main courses and my choices were limited because of my gluten intolerance (it’s already getting on my nerves!!). Instead we selected a mediterranean platter, a superfood chicken salad and an onion and tomato salad which we shared. We’d worried we wouldn’t have enough but in the end it was plenty especially after dessert (mango sorbet for the teen and an Affogato ice cream for me. The caffeine shot perked me up and we wandered off to meet some friends for a drink.

Saturday was busy. We had a lot to pack in before heading back to Wales and we did just that. I’m just going to share with you a few of our highlights and things we loved, suggest some things you should check out if you can, and give a quick round-up of what we thought …I will be brief, but with lots of pictures.

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Entrance to the castle

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cheerful chutney selling ladies from Usk River

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Beautiful packaging and delicious chocolate at Sue Gilmour’s Wonderful World of Chocolate

Ed, who previously worked in a bank, won The Great British Bake Off in 2010. He gave up the day job to bake full-time, has two cookbooks out already (The Boy Who Bakes and Say it With Cake), with his new one out now. He made a chocolate and passionfruit curd tart topped with chocolate ganache.

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entrance to the inner bailey

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The teen doing some serious curry and mango chutney sampling

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fit onion seller

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We even bumped into Boysie

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The lovely coffee lady who gave us some of her coffee…from the little coffee bag company

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Cheese’s with their own names from Orsom…little cheese, big personality…Woodew? we defintely would…we took one home with us

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Tasting hot chocolate with the chocolate man from The Copper Pot...we brought two bags of hot chocolate and a recipe book home..my favourite has to be the chilli and orange recipe from 1685

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hipster fudge sellers at UFO

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Steam punk treats from the travelling emporium…that’s where we bought our Absinthe marzepan

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strange man from the emporium of all sorts of weird things

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Cooking Like Cleopatra class with Egyptian born Marina Ibrahim...simple techniques with a bit of fun thrown in

Cooking Like Cleopatra class with Egyptian born Marina Ibrahim…simple techniques with a bit of fun thrown in

Marina’s mantra is “you can’t be wrong, if your recipe is cooked with love the food is going to be good!” I like this mantra, totally get where she’s coming from. Her cookery class focused on two traditional Egyptian dishes, Shakshuka and a beetroot salad. The class was simple, fun and practical. Even the fez wearing girls at the back, who appeared to have sampled one or two of the local ales managed admirably.

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eager participants getting into the spirit of it with fez’s

From one female chef to the next…this time Rayeesa and her southern Indian Secrets masterclass. Encouraging her class to be liberal with the spices she demonstrated how to make a traditional dahl, sharing handy tips (don’t add salt to the lentils til later or they won’t cook!)

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Rayeesa from Rayeesa’s Indian Kitchen in Hertfordshire running her Indian Vegetarian class (the teen’s choice)

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spices at Rayeesa’s Indian cookery masterclass

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we swooned (a little) over Marcus Bean (from ITV This Morning….although I never watch it)

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cookery class participants enjoying their creations

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…and I swooned even more over Chris Burt…who is genuinely lovely guy and a very talented chef committed to keeping it local. A trip to Shrewsbury to visit his restaurant Momo No Ki is on my bucket list of food places I must visit…soon!

We finished the day with THAT coffee masterclass and bounced off home happy, both agreeing that it was one of the best food festivals we’d ever attended. We even managed not to argue!

A big thankyou to Ludlow for their hospitality and friendliness and producers that gave us lots of lovely things to eat and drink, this was our swag from the day….some purchased, some freebies! I’ve mentioned a few of our favourites, but we also loved the Merangz from The Little Round Cake Company and Granny Tiggs sauce

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Masterclasses with Aroma coffee at Ludlow Food Festival

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September 29th was apparently international coffee day, a day for people to celebrate their love for the dark liquid. I totally missed it as I do most of these ‘international’ days. There are so many of them we’d be celebrating something every week if we remembered them all. A couple of weeks ago the teen and I had our own coffee celebration at this years Ludlow Food Festival (there will be more on this in a future post) where we joined a coffee masterclass run by Andrew from Aroma tea and coffee merchants in Shrewsbury.

Both the teen and I love coffee, not the cheap instant stuff; proper, rich, creamy coffee.  But its something of a love/hate relationship. The teen has ADHD (caffeine + hyperactivity  = bad combination) and can’t tolerate too much, while I am somewhat sensitive to too much caffeine as well. If I drink it after three in the afternoon I can’t sleep at night. Generally speaking I am more of a tea addict, being raised in a typically British family where hot sweet tea was the solution to everything, it could cure any angst, shock, upset and always, in my granddad’s house, came in half pint mugs (his was often laced with whisky, which I have never succumbed too). Even with tea if I drink too much I find myself suffering a caffeine crash when it wears off. We anticipated that the effects of all this coffee tasting could be interesting!

Although I know the taste of good coffee and know what I like, I am no coffee expert. I was the perfect attentive student, wanting to understand and know more. The class was expertly run, fun and very informative and I soon learned the difference between Arabica and Robusta varieties; Arabica beans are longer in shape and a generally more desirable bean, while Robusta beans are wider and fatter and often considered the poor relation. I also learned that beans come from the pod or cherry, either ‘pea’ shaped or as two separate beans. I now know that beans from different countries and environments differ considerably; Columbian (high consistency of flavour), Kenyan (peaberry coffee, almost sweet, with lemony, citrus hints) and Indian beans  (high humidity, slow dry, lighter, smoother, richer coffee) and have their own distinct personality. We travelled through the process from bean to perfect roast in the search for the best cup of coffee, and imbibing plenty along the way.

We examined beans, discussed oil content, texture, shape and flavour. Andrew then tipped the beans (sourced from Cafe Feminino, an organisation which supports women working in the coffee trade) into the small roaster he’d set up in the marquee, heated to 200 degrees. The smell of roasting coffee, the caffeine hit we’d already had, made us feel slightly euphoric. I tried hard to concentrate but was beginning to feel the effects!

coffee beans, pure and unroasted

coffee beans, pure and unroasted

a 'peaberry' coffee bean

a ‘peaberry’ coffee bean

2 beans

Andrew showing us the Cafe Feminino beans

Andrew showing us the Cafe Feminino beans

More tasting next, we sampled different roasts of coffee and could easily distinguish the difference,  then we looked at different grinds and the best method to prepare them for drinking. Fine ground for Turkish style, coarser ground for Italian stove top pots and cafetierres. By now I had to cut my tasting to a sip for fear of bouncing around the tent like a drug crazed loon.

 

pouring the beans into the roaster

pouring the beans into the roaster

small roaster with drum for turning and cooling the beans once roasted

small roaster with drum for turning and cooling the beans once roasted

another small variety of roaster...this copper one is for using on the stove top

another small variety of roaster…this copper one is for using on the stove top

removing a sample to check the roast

removing a sample to check the roast

once the beans reach the desired level of roast they are released from the drum into the bottom container to cool

the beans are released into the bottom drum to cool once they reach the desired level of roast

demonstrating the different ways coffee can be prepared and how it affects the flavour...caffetiere coffee is very different to Italian style, Turkish, or filter

demonstrating the different ways coffee can be prepared and how it affects the flavour…caffetiere coffee is very different to Italian style, Turkish, or filter

I tried to keep writing notes but my eager concentration from earlier in the session had left me. As finished up and awaited our complimentary bag of coffee (mine coarse ground for my favoured preparation method and the teens roasted beans), we admitted we were caffeine-d out; dilated pupils, muddled brain, barely able to string a sentence together, all of it.

When I finally returned to some level of normality I realised I had taken it all in, I now had a greater understanding of the coffee-making process and the science behind it. So hopefully when I speak to the one or two coffee roasters I know locally I can sound vaguely knowledgable. I’m never going to make a high-class barista, but I’m content that I know a bit more about what I’m drinking.

the cool coffee beans being packaged for us to take home

the cool coffee beans being packaged for us to take home

teen looking very pleased with her special coffee beans

teen looking very pleased with her special coffee beans, if slightly dazed after the amount of caffeine consumed

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Robust venison goulash for an Autumn supper

food festival Ludlow 2014 276I know it hasn’t been particularly Autumnal of late, but as the nights start to draw in and the evenings are beginning to cool, I’ve found myself craving  the dishes I associate with this time of year. With back to school and work routines now in place I long for comfort food. Out go the summer salads, BBQ’s and light meals designed for hot evenings and in come roast dinners, casseroles and hearty flavoursome stews (although this weekend was perfect BBQ weather!).

The Autumn and winter months also herald the beginning of game season, and although these days Venison is available across the year it’s still associated with the hunting, shooting and fishing season, and this might be why it’s overlooked. It’s often seen as a bit expensive for ordinary folk and just for those ‘posh’ people who wear red jackets, riding hats and have an expansive wallet. There is also of course the emotional, “poor Bambi” reaction which I often hear from people,while others aren’t sure they would like the taste, thinking it’s too strongly flavoured.

Some of this fear of venison is related to previous experience. If it was a bad experience then the obvious reaction is to avoid, or perhaps it was nice first time round and the flavour was different the second time. Production methods and labelling were less consistent in the past, plus the label never distinguished between types of venison, red deer for example tastes different to fallow deer. These days however many local butchers and game specialists routinely stock venison, and opinion is slowly shifting. Why? because production methods have improved, the processing of wild venison is quicker, there are more deer farmers out there and in both cases improved methods produce meat with a more consistent flavour and quality.

Venison is so similar to beef the two are often confused but it differs in that it is leaner, has more protein, more iron and B vitamins making it a good health choice. Also, because wild deer lives on wild and pasture food there is a minimal fat content in the meat and what is there has higher levels of conjugated linoleic acid (a possible protector against heart disease and cancer). Because it is like beef it also cooks in a similar way. Steaks are best cooked fast on a high heat or a BBQ, while diced venison takes well to slow cooking and robust sauces. I used diced venison to make a rich Goulash, a family favourite. Its quick and easy to prepare and although it takes a long time to cook you can stick it in the oven and go do other things while you are waiting.

If you want to give venison a try, now is a great time. The deer have spent the summer feeding on wild food and pasture so the meat is top quality and not very expensive. I purchased my venison from my butcher (G Williams & Son in Bangor). It came pre-packed in a 500g tray and cost £4.00.

Venison Goulash:

Serves four as a lunch dish (served with some rye bread or similar) or 2-3 as a main course dinner with lightly steamed vegetables

1 tablespoon vegetable oil (plus a knob of butter)

500g diced venison

1 large onion finely sliced

2 cloves of garlic (chopped or crushed)

1 teaspoon caraway seeds

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

1 teaspoon plain flour

350g fresh tomatoes chopped (or tinned in the winter months)

300ml beef stock

400g small potatoes, washed, peeled if necessary and chopped into chunks

salt and pepper

Preheat the oven gas mark 3/160 degrees C

Heat a large non-stick pan and add the oil. Add venison when its nice and hot and brown over a medium heat. Once browned tip into an oven proof casserole dish. Add the butter to the pan and tip in the sliced onion. Cook for about 15 minutes until starting to soften and change colour. Add the garlic, caraway, paprika and stir for a minute then sprinkle over the flour, add tomatoes and stock. Stir to combine and bring to a simmer then tip over the venison in the casserole dish.

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Pop on a lid and put in the oven for an hour. After an hour tip in the potatoes and cook in the oven for a further 30 mins.

Once the potatoes are tender serve with a glass of red wine (unless its lunch time and you have to work afterwards) and some hearty rye bread to mop up the sauce.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under British food, Butchers, family budget cooking, Game recipes, home cooking, local produce, Organic meat, Recipes, seasonal food

I’m back! …with two recipes from the Menai Seafood Festival: Scallops tartare and French Eel stew

Its been a long and busy summer. I know this because I haven’t written a thing on here since 9th June. Such a long time for me! So what have you been doing with yourself?I hear you ask. I’m sure some of you have followed my exploits through Twitter or Facebook so already know I’ve barely kept still, or stayed in one place for long.

I have fed crews at three festivals, cooked for five brides and grooms, been a private chef for a couple of dinners, and helped co-ordinate one food festival. I’ve also been busy fitting a new business premises ( I now have my very own kitchen and hopefully soon cookery school) and visited schools running seafood demo’s across Anglesey as part of the Menai Seafood Festival.

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In between all of that I’ve tried to have a life and spend time with my kids! It all sounds like hard work, but I can’t complain. Its fun work. Work I adore and I consider myself fortunate (if not rich) to be working at something I love and have a passion for.

Now that Autumn approaches and the whirlwind of activity is calming a little its back to those other things I love. Writing, food festivals and teaching. My mission for the winter is to find, beg, borrow, the finances I need to refit the cookery school and get it up and running. I will return to this in another post as it deserves a full explanation.

I also made a promise at the Menai Seafood Festival that I would post my two French themed seafood festival demo recipes. I stood in at the last-minute due to another chef dropping out. I said I wouldn’t because I was coordinating the two tents, but actually on the day it wasn’t that stressful and I’m so glad I did because it was such good fun!

 

So here to get you going and mark my return to writing are the two recipes of the day, sadly I have no pictures but all the testers gave the thumbs up! As you can see there were plenty in attendence.

Scallop tartare and French conger eel stew

I wanted to introduce visitors to a different way to prepare scallops and a new fish. In the case of the latter, conger eel is a little used fish which people often overlook. Daunted by the way it looks, full of preconceived ideas about how it will taste they don’t even consider it as an option. Many immediately think of jellied eels when you say eel and I could see plenty of the crowd watching my demo cringe when I said I was cooking eel. Several said they tried it and hated it. I’m always up for a challenge so my aim was to change their mind. Eel is not overfished, it is sustainable and it is cheap. Yes it has a large central bone, but its easy to remove the meat in neat chunks for a simple stew.

Scallops tartare with blue poppy seeds

Ingredients:
Dozen scallops
1 teaspoon blue poppy seeds
Juice of 1 lime
2 tablespoons olive oil
Drop of soy sauce
Sea salt

2 white plates to serve
Remove the coral from the scallops, we only want to use the white part. Slice and arrange in a rosette pattern on a plate. Zest the lime and make a dressing mixing the olive oil, soy sauce, lime zest, a teaspoon of lime juice and salt.
Baste scallops with the dressing and sprinkle with poppy seeds. Leave to stand for 5 minutes and then serve.

French eel stew (for two people)

Ingredients:

Eel (2k) killed, skinned cleaned and cut into chunks.
3 large shallots
12 baby onions
200g chestnut mushrooms
Bouquet garni
30g plain flour
30g butter
300ml fish stock
300ml red wine
12 small new potatoes
Seasoning

Flat leaf parsley to serve

Get your fish monger to skin and clean the eel. At home you can run a sharp knife along the central bone which is thick and gently cut the flesh away making sure you remove any of the remaining bones as you go. They are easy to find as eel bones are pretty big.

Melt the butter and brown sliced shallots. Add flour, then fish stock followed by the red wine. Add bouquet garni, onions, mushrooms and halved potatoes. Simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until the potatoes begin to cook through. Add the chunks of eel and simmer for a further 10 minutes until the potatoes are tender and the eel cooked through. Season well and serve sprinkled with plenty of chopped flat leaf parsley.

A big thank you to Wayne at Mermaid Seafoods for supplying produce for the demo tents and indulging my demand for conger eel

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Filed under festival food, Food festival, French food, home cooking, local produce, Recipes, Seafood recipes, sustainable fish, Uncategorized, Welsh produce

One for midweek..Moroccan lamb and spinach balls with harissa tomato sauce (couscous and minty yogurt)

Sometimes my decision-making skills seem distinctly lacking. There are times when I endlessly dither over the tiniest details, instead of going with my instincts, until I drive myself (and others mad) with my inability to make up my mind. I know it’s an infuriating trait and its so stupid when I can make monumental life changing decisions, big business choices,  but can’t decide if I want meatballs for dinner or something with some Moroccan spice.

I hope for divine inspiration, umm and ah for a while, running ideas by the boy who seems impressed and so we eventually come up with Moroccan spiced meatballs. Throw in some fresh spinach (which I have in good supply now my local veg box is running again) and there. How easy was that?

A family feast ...Moroccan lamb and spinach balls, couscous and minty yogurt

A family feast …Moroccan lamb and spinach balls, couscous and minty yogurt

Moroccan lamb and spinach balls, harissa tomato sauce (couscous and yogurt with mint): recipe for up to four (although Aidan and I were very hungry after our Sunday run so ate three-quarters of them!)

For the meatballs:

500g lamb mince

100g finely chopped spinach

clove garlic finely minced

2 teaspoons ras al hanout

1 teaspoon cumin

1 egg beaten

zest of 1 lemon

salt and pepper

1 tablespoon oil to fry

For the sauce:

small red onion finely chopped

1 tin of chopped tomatoes

1 teaspoon harissa

150ml chicken stock

one dessertspoonful sun-dried tomato paste

salt/ pepper and a pinch of sugar if the sauce seems a bit tart (tinned tomatoes are often quite acidic)

**

Mix the lamb, spinach, spices, garlic, seasonings, lemon zest and egg in a large bowl. Use your hands to knead it all together so the spices are completely distributed. Form into bite size balls.

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Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the lamb balls and fry over a medium heat until nicely brown all over. Remove and keep to one side. Add a little more olive oil if necessary (you will probably find that enough oil remains) and turn the heat down a bit. Add the onion and garlic and sweat gently for about five to ten minutes. Add the tomatoes, harissa, tomato paste and stock and turn the heat up again. Bring to a gentle simmer and return the balls to the pan cooking gently for about 25 minutes, or until the sauce has cooked down and thickened. Check the seasoning adding salt, pepper and a pinch of sugar if the tomatoes are a bit acidic.

Serve with couscous (try Yotam Ottolenghi’s Green Couscous from his book Plenty it’s an absolute favourite…or make a variation as I did below..

Serves 4

150g couscous
160ml vegetable stock
1 small red onion, finely chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
salt and pepper
sml tsp ground cumin
3 spring onions, finely sliced
30g rocket, chopped

juice of half a lemon
handful of coriander finely chopped

Place the couscous in a large shallow dish and cover with the stock. Cover the dish with cling film and leave for 10 minutes or so.

Meanwhile, fry the onion in olive oil on a medium heat until golden and completely soft. Add the salt and cumin, and mix well leaving to fry for a minute. Stir onion mixture into the couscous, fluffing up the grains with a fork as you go. Add the remaining ingredients mixing together well.

To finish mix a handful of finely chopped mint into a small bowl of Rachel’s low-fat natural yogurt with a pinch of sea salt.

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Filed under family budget cooking, home cooking, local produce, middle eastern food, Recipes, salads, seasonal food

The sensory pleasure of Bristol

I visited Bristol once for an interview at the university. This was years ago when I was still an academic researcher, searching for a highly sought after PhD place just before I had kids. Despite seeing little of the city I liked the feel of the place; it had a nice vibe and the people were friendly.  I didn’t get the PhD place so never discovered more and was just left with that brief first impression.

Last year the teen started visiting Bristol. She too fell in love with its hippy vibe, its cool vintage shops, eclectic night life and variety of festival loving people. She fitted right in. I promised myself a return visit to see for myself exactly what it was she had fallen in love with, and as several of my ‘Green Man’ crew friends live there (one of whom just a couple of weeks away from having her first baby) I took the opportunity on a rare weekend off work.

It didn’t take me long to fall in love all over again. Precisely half an hour I’d say. As soon as I sat down in the sun outside The Bristolian with a late lunch I knew I didn’t want to go home. One of the friends with whom I stayed lives in Montpelier, arguably the most vibrant, up and coming part of the city where everyone is hip, cool and arty. Essential accessories include a guitar, a skateboard and a beard (although not if you are a woman of course…save that for Eurovision).

I felt at home among the vintage shops, graffiti adorned walls and independent cafes and shops. The share and recycle culture is clear. Just up the road from my friend’s house is the street where locals rioted in protest at a Tesco moving in. I’d probably have been one of them if I lived there. Sadly it didn’t stop the multinational opening shop, but they did make their point loud and clear.

Imagine the slightly stoned crowd of a festival, transplant it back in a city and there you have Bristol. Ok so I happened to visit on a particularly sun drenched weekend, this probably helped, and the Rave On Avon music festival (we went to see a band playing as part of the festival, the Bombs with their soulful, funky trip hop tinged with a bit of rock) was in full swing, but it seems to me that every weekend has a festival of some kind happening just down the road, plus there is street art everywhere, so many local food producers, purveyors and markets, cool community owned and run venues like The Canteen where we watched the Bombs and music hanging in the air. They even have their own currency!! Bristol is a city of sensory overload, but not in the 100-miles-an-hour London kind of way, of community, of recycling…..I could go on but I’ll tell you what, feast your eyes on the pictures instead…they will show you exactly why I love Bristol!

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Thali cafe at the Tobacco Factory Produce market

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Local produce and street art at the Tobacco Factory

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Eli enjoying a gigantic cheese straw

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More Love at the Old Police Station

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Aren’t we all 🙂

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Say No to Monsanto…mural at Stokes Croft

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