Tag Archives: local produce markets in Wales

Abersoch Makers Market

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It’s a few weeks since I took a little trip down to the Abersoch Makers Market, but as usual I’ve been busy with other jobs, trips and recipe development but I wanted to say something before the experience passes into the hazy mist of my memory and I forget all about it.

I don’t think the weather could have been better for this inaugural Abersoch market. The latest in a series of Makers Markets taking part across the North West, this was the first in Wales bringing together a host of local food, drink, art and craft producers and those from further afield. On the day I visited there were a variety of stall holders, some were local artisans while others were members of the Makers Market collective who run regular events in Bramhall, Cheadle and Winsford. Several participants had indeed travelled from Cheshire.

Abersoch is one of the best places to get a summer market going. The population in the area swells between May and September with a mixture of affluent city dwellers (Cheshire and the Wirral being the main culprits) decamping to holiday homes, short visit holidaying tourists plus a hoard of day trippers and weekenders from Manchester and Liverpool that flood in during sunny weekends. The small quiet town, popular with surfers and sailors almost turns into a mini city and this was almost the case on the day I visited. The Saturday marked the beginning of a bank holiday weekend which was luckily graced with blazing sunshine (although still bitterly cold) and as a result, a huge crowd. Throw in some live music, a beautiful harbour side location and you are on to a winner. I was very glad I’d travelled down early, browsing and grabbing some lunch before heading back out. As I drove along the A487 I watched the lines of traffic grow. I breathed an inward sigh of relief that I wasn’t stuck in it.

The market itself was buzzing and several stall’s were buzzing with customers. ‘Shabby chic’ and ‘vintage’ craft stalls drew the most attention, clearly popular among the market visitors while other stalls selling hand-made soaps did less well.

In terms of fresh produce, I think they could have done with a bit more variety. I know one or two traders that held back this time (my other reason for visiting was to do a rekkie for Moelyci to see what it was like before they forked out a hefty £35 pitch fee; a high price for some of our local producers). Perhaps others were also being cautious and waiting to see how the market did before signing up, but hopefully more suppliers will join in as time goes on.

While there was a conspicuous absence of fresh produce such as locally grown veg, plants or bread it was rather heavy on the pie and cake. Nothing jumped out at me as being really artisan or unusual (there were several familiar faces that attend a few markets) while much of what was on offer was predictably expensive. Even the hot food was rather samey…artisan, locally made sausages from Buster’s Bangers (which were very nice I might add), local lamb burgers that kind of thing. It’s the kind of market that encourages you to buy things you don’t need rather than going along to do a weekend shop (the main reason I like to visit a market). Sure its nice to get a few treats, but if we want to encourage people to buy local produce and not hit the supermarket, the products must be on offer.

The market was enjoyable, had a great feel to it and will probably do very well with the tourist trade…but as an artisan market, or as a local farmers market? Well, it felt much the same as other markets in the local area so I’m not sure I would regularly drive for an hour  once a month to visit.

But still,  in my eyes all artisan markets are good so I hope they do well!

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A busy food marquee, even quite early in the morning

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Pies, pies and more pies….sold by men in skirts!

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…and lots of tarts and cakes

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and bizarrely tucked in among the craft stalls were oysters and champagne….bu unfortunately not local Welsh Oysters

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Nice home-made sausages from Busters Bangers

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Shabby chic and bunting

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A trip to market, a French supper, a mini croquembouche and a chicken liver and cognac parfait to die for

It was our first day back outside with the Ogwen produce market and hooray!! The sun shone bathing us in a few glorious rays. Outside was warmer than it had been inside the church hall (our winter home), so we were happy to be back there; and so it seems, were the market visitors. All of a sudden we were busy again. On such a gorgeous day though who wouldn’t enjoy whiling away an hour or so; picking up some great local produce and soaking in a bit of vitamin D over a panad (that’s cup of tea to you non-Welsh speakers…but our coffee is popular too!).

The market square with its wrought ironwork and raised flower beds has become the ‘heart’ of Bethesda and no one was happier to be back than I. Once more ensconced in my purpose-built kitchen and out of the ‘cupboard’ at the front of the church hall. I was happy. You can tell from the picture as I’m smiling for a change.

As usual the market was an eclectic and sometimes eccentric mix of food and local crafts

There was local veg from Tatws Bryn, and Moelyci who had loads of spinach, rainbow chard and kale (pretty much the only thing that’s really great in the garden at this time of year). There was fab bread from Becws Alun and Model Bakery, who also tempted us with Kurdish pasties laced with piri-piri sauce. They were huge enough to sustain even the hungriest hiker!. Of course Lynwen was there with her amazing vegan cupcakes from Aderyn Melys, plus more traditional cakes, flapjacks, Madeline’s etc. from Cegin Brysur;  there was cheese from Caws Rhyd y Delyn, traditional greek pastries, meat from Tom at the local farm (his pork and tomato sausages are our favourites) and chocolate from Cariad.

On the craft side there were my usual favourites; all kinds of pretty things made with buttons from Miss Marple Makes, cards, badges and jewellery from Dyfal Donc and Phia Eco plus cards, cushions and lots of lovely bits and bobs.

…and then there was me, back at home in my little cafe selling local bacon baps, tomato and pork sausage baps with red onion marmalade and simple vegetable soup with wild garlic puree and creme fraiche, plus organic fair trade tea and coffee

Back home I didn’t have time to collapse in a heap, I had plenty to do for the evenings supper club. A private party for twelve with a French themed menu. I wouldn’t normally do two jobs back to back, God no…some would say I’m a masochist, but it was the only date our guests to make and the market is always the second Saturday…what could I do! I decided to go with it. You probably think me insane (and after doing it I’d probably agree!)

I prepped a fair bit the day before to get a head start. I made chicken liver and cognac parfait, red onion marmalade and the bread. All of which would be good the day after. But I still had to make the mini bite sized wild garlic and balsamic red onion tarts (Amuse Bouche) served with sloe gin slings…not very French I know. Gin sling hadn’t been the intention. I was planning on making Damson Martini’s but I discovered much too late that the last drop of Damson vodka I’d used to experiment with, was in fact the last bottle in the house. I thought I had more hidden at the back of the cupboard (away from the teen), but clearly I was mistaken. Instead we cracked open the sloe gin.

Starters all plated up and ready to go.

As a special birthday treat I decided to make a croquembouche for dessert (a French dessert made from cream filled profiteroles and caramel piled into a cone shape).  I’ve made profiteroles lots of times so didn’t think it could be that hard. I studied the pictures in my Raymond Blanc book (even though I wasn’t expecting to emulate his effort!) and decided how I was going to decorate it. I’d read somewhere that you shouldn’t attempt to make one if it’s raining…so I prayed for the weather to hold up. I wasn’t sure how long it would take me to make it…or how soon in advance I should make my choux pastry so on Saturday afternoon, when I hadn’t even started, everyone else was panicking and telling me I was an over-ambitious fool… but I held my nerve and got to it. It was far from perfect and was much smaller than I’d anticipated, but I was quite proud of my effort, even though it looked more like a small hillock than a mountainous cone.  Still, the orange patisserie cream filled profiteroles glistened with golden caramel, as spun sugar wrapped the choux pastry balls in a delicate web. I finished the little mound with a sprinkle of edible gold stars. At least it was too small to collapse!

I’m not sure if it was the promise of help for the evening (from a keen friend), or tiredness from a day of cooking, but I remained remarkably calm throughout, much to the surprise of all those around me.Our  guests loved the food and this is a snippet from the email they sent me the next day…

"the food was way way out of the ordinary, and in that category of one off meals that you never forget 
as they stand out so obviously from the rest and the most !....the best pate I've ever tasted in my life!
...and I would probs say that that was the yummiest dessert I've ever had........I was so full but yet it
was SO light and slid down so easily that I had seconds"

I think towards the end of the night I got a little too comfortable with the bottle of wine in front of me and didn’t end up going to bed until 1.15am….I regreted it the next morning I can tell you…Clearing the last of the debris with a hangover was definitely not what the doctor ordered…but it was a damn good Saturday.

Chicken and Cognac pate (the best pate ever…allegedly. Serves 12 in small ramekins, or make one large dish)

1 large Echalion shallot finely chopped

2 cloves garlic finely chopped

1 teaspoon walnut oil

500g chicken livers (washed, cleaned and drained well)

4 tablespoons cognac

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

150g melted butter (plus 25g for cooking and 50g or so to finish)

a teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

a pinch of cinnamon, salt & pepper

Sweat the shallot and garlic gently in 25g butter and teaspoon walnut oil. When soft and turning golden add the well-drained chicken livers. Cook over a medium heat until browned all over, it should take about 5 to 10 minutes. Remove the chicken livers with a slotted spoon and put in the bowl of a food processor. Add the Cognac to the hot pan and cook down until thick. Scrape any stuck bits off the bottom of the pan as these will add flavour. Adds this to the food processor with mustard, thyme, cinnamon, salt and pepper. Melt the 150g butter and add this to the processor too then blitz everything well until smooth. Transfer to a terrine dish or individual ramekins. Melt another 50 g butter and use to finish the pate pouring over the top to create a lid. This will stop it discolouring.

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